Lively Acadian Culture

Come and experience the lively Acadian culture of the North Cape Coastal Drive through the food and music of the Acadians.  Fiddle music, stories, fricot and râpure are sure to be on the menu during any visit to the Village musical acadien .  Traditional dishes like chicken fricot (chicken stew) and the festive râpure (grated potato, pork and summer savory casserole) could always be found on the menu when receiving guests.

The Acadians, who came to North America from 1604 onward, are the descendants of French settlers. They were the first of the European groups to settle on the island then called Isle-Saint-Jean, under French rule.  Most of the settlers originated from the western part of central France. Certain family names are very common to this day; during your visits, you are sure to encounter a DesRoches or an Arsenault.

 

Some Original Acadian Family Names

Arsenault
Bernard
Blanchard
Bourque
Buote
Chiasson
DesRoches
Doiron
Doucette
Gallant
Gaudet
Landry
Martin
Pineau
Pitre
Poirier
Richard
Rousselle

 

Evangeline Region

As you travel around North Cape Coastal Drive, you may notice references to “La Région Évangéline” -The Evangeline Region. The Acadians of Prince Edward Island, and all the Canadian Maritimes, are a tenacious people who persevered through many severe setbacks – particularly the Great Deportation that began in August 1755. Nearly 2,000 Acadians deported from Isle-Saint-Jean (Prince Edward Island) perished in the North Atlantic.

Many artistic works have been inspired by this tragic time, and one of the first was the epic poem Evangeline, A Tale of Acadie, written by the famous American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in 1847.  You can learn more about Evangeline and her star-crossed lover, Gabriel, at the Acadian Museum of PEI in Miscouche.

 

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